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Do Hong Kong Police Carry Guns

Do Hong Kong Police Carry Guns?

Police forces from all over the globe carry different tools and equipment to stop crime and protect themselves and those around them. However, Hong Kong enforces strict gun control laws to curb its violent crime rates. 

As such, it is understandable to wonder what the Hong Kong Police Force uses to defend itself and prevent harm. 

Are the Hong Kong Police Force allowed to carry guns?

Are the Hong Kong Police Force allowed to carry guns

The Hong Kong Police Force is allowed to carry and use sidearms despite Hong Kong’s strict gun control laws. Most police officers bring a .38 calibre revolver as their primary weapon.

Are there differences in guns used by units in Hong Kong?

The Hong Kong Police Force does use a variety of firearms depending on their job and unit. The most common loadout for a Hong Kong police officer is a Smith and Wesson Model 10 .38 calibre revolver.

Detectives also used .39 Colt Detective Special revolvers, which were eventually replaced by Sig Sauer pistols.

Different units carry different equipment. The Police Tactical Unit and other forces usually carry Remington 870 pump-action shotguns and variations of the AR-15. 

These firearms saw the most action during the protests in 2016 and 2019. During the demonstrations, protestors and investigators saw police using Federal Model 201-Z riot guns, M16A1s, M16A2s, Sig 516s, and Pepperball VKS.

Most of these guns were loaded with less-than-lethal rounds, such as rubber bullets, tear gas, and pepper spray, as they were primarily used for crowd control and dispersal.

In addition to these firearms, the Hong Kong Police Force is also considering adding tasers to their arsenal. This information is according to a report by Apple Daily.

Where does the Hong Kong Police Force get its guns and ammunition?

Where does the Hong Kong Police Force get its guns and ammunition

The Hong Kong Police Force originally got its weaponry from American and European manufacturers like Smith and Wesson and Glock.  

However, due to the National Security Law, the US enforced sanctions blocking the selling and provision of weapons and ammo to Hong Kong. So, today, Hong Kong looks for weapons from other places, like China.

Previously, Hong Kong police looked to US manufacturers like Heckler and Koch, Remington, and SIG Sauer, aside from the two we already mentioned. 

Now, according to the South China Morning Post, the Hong Kong police is also receiving dozens of QSZ-92 pistols imported from the mainland for testing.

According to the Hong Kong Free Press, the police force is also set on procuring a supply of Czech-made Scorpion Evo 3. 

This shows that Hong Kong police are looking worldwide for alternative gun sources at the moment.

Is gun-related police brutality a problem in Hong Kong?

Is gun-related police brutality a problem in Hong Kong

Police brutality in Hong Kong seems to have been a problem only recently, most specifically during the 2019 protests. The Hong Kong Police Force was caught employing heavy-handed crowd control methods that many deem abusive and even unlawful.

The Hong Kong police used guns during the demonstrations, primarily to deploy tear gas as a way to disperse the crowds. The police officers also drew their guns and pointed them at the protesters.

According to Reuters and other news sources, the Hong Kong Police Force also used paintball guns, launchers, pressure sprays, and AR-15-like weapons to deploy tear gas, pepper spray, sponge grenades, and shoot rubber bullets and bean bag rounds.

The Hong Kong Police Force rarely used live ammunition during these protests, but many documented the police firing live rounds. An 18-year-old secondary student was shot in the chest, while a 14-year-old boy was shot in the leg.

In addition, according to Amnesty International, many of the people they interviewed said they experienced abuse and beatings, especially for being uncooperative or refusing to answer questions while in detention.

These actions, in addition to the increasing unrest, unhappiness, and political tensions between Hong Kong and mainland China seem to contribute to the trend of Hong Kongers leaving the region.

Many civilians also complained about the aftereffects of the crowd control methods employed by the police. Hong Kong residents said they could smell the pungent odour of the tear gas in their apartments even if they were storeys above ground.

Can civilians carry guns and weapons in Hong Kong?

Can civilians carry guns and weapons in Hong Kong

There are many things to do for civilians in Hong Kong, but carrying a firearm is not one of them. Residents of Hong Kong, visitors, and transit passengers cannot carry guns and certain weapons. 

Section 13 of Cap 238 prohibits people from possessing arms or ammunition unless they hold a license for possession or a dealer’s license for the items.

Those found in possession without licenses could be fined $100,000 and imprisoned for 14 years.

In addition, items such as gravity knives and batons, knuckle dusters, spring-loaded knives, and other weapons are also prohibited. 

It is essential to note that there are exceptions to the rules. Gun clubs, shooting ranges, and dealers can possess pistols, rifles, shotguns, and other firearms. 

These guns are used for training, demonstration, and testing, as members of these organizations can train civilians for competitions and government agents and officials for duty.

However, these weapons and ammunition must be stored in the gun club premises at all times. If you bring a firearm home, you may be prosecuted.

What is the death rate related to guns in Hong Kong?

YearNumber of deaths resulting from firearms, according to gunpolicy.org
20173
20163
20152

Due to heavy gun control, Hong Kong’s annual gun-related deaths are surprisingly low. According to GunPolicy.org, there were three deaths caused by firearms in 2017. 

Even gun deaths related to legal intervention are rare, although this may be partly since the last recorded data was from 2013. 

YearNumber of deaths due to legal intervention
20131
20101
20071
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